Tribal.Europa

🌲- European History, Folklore & Linguistics
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Pais Dinogad 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿, Amongst the oldest surviving Welsh poetry is an account of battles in the Old North, a text known after the protagonists as Y Gododdin. In the same manuscripts are a couple of odd bits of verse which clearly do not belong, and one of these is a nursery rhyme in which a mother tells her son - the Dinogad of the title - about his father's hunting prowess. The most interesting line historically is the one about the father fishing on Rayadyr Derwennyd, which means the Waterfall of Derwent. This is Derwentwater in the Lake District of nowadays England, and the waterfall is thought to be the Lodore falls nearby.

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The Story of Rotta in Old Dutch, Deep underground in the centre of Rotterdam are the remains of the Rotta settlement from the 10th and 11th centuries. The village was located on the banks of the river Rotte. About 10 years ago, a mound with the remains of six successive farms from the period 950-1050 was documented in the construction pit of the Markthal. The data from the youngest farm was used to create the animation. The film shows the landscape of the Rotte (River) around 1020 AD. with the yards and farms on the banks. The youngest farm of the Markthal can be seen in detail. The story of Rotta is told in Old Dutch by a resident of the farm. His grandfather was one of the first cultivators of the extensive swamp area of the Rotte. No subtitles in English unfortunately, but in Dutch and Old Dutch. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCIoukLfmdXjc6dag9-7BR5g

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↟ Ljuspelare - Pillar of Light ↟ 🇬🇧 - in comment below! ⬇️ Under vintertid kan dessa mytiska och fascinerande ljuspelare uppenbara sig på himlen på natten vid frostdis - som bildas vid sträng kyla. Detta ljusfenomen kommer från en artificiell ljuskälla och själva speglingen sker genom att ljus från konstgjorda ljuskällor som exempel gatlyktor, reflekteras i horisontella iskristaller. Vid sträng kyla när det är flera minusgrader och stilla ute, omvandlas den lilla fukt som är kvar i luften till små platta iskristaller. Luften fylls då av dessa små iskristaller som ofta lägger sig horisontellt och när ljus då skiner på dem så reflekteras ljuset i kristallernas under -och ovansidor som reser sig likt pelare mot himlen. Ljusfenomenet kan även uppstå ovanför solen vintertid när den står lågt på eftermiddagen. Just nu har vi -14°C ner till -32°C på många håll i Sverige, passa på att... - fortsättning i kommentar nedan ⬇️ Follow @NativeScandinavia 🌲 https://www.instagram.com/p/CmRBRwAtQUc/?igshid=MDJmNzVkMjY=

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Chaoskampf in Tongeren. In het omsloten heiligdom van de god Jupiter te Tongeren stond er een grote zuil voor het altaar. Dit soort zuilen kwamen op zich veel voor bij Romeinse tempels, al is dit exemplaar een interessant voorbeeld van de inheemse invloed op de Romeinse godsdienst in Germanië. De sokkel van de zuil bestond uit een steen met gekleurde reliëfs van andere goden. De zuilschacht is versierd met een schubbenmotief en eindigt in een kapiteel met daar op een standbeeld. Dit standbeeld stelt de god Jupiter te paard voor die een slangachtige gigant vertrapt. De voorstelling van een hemelse god die onderaardse krachten, vaak afgebeeld als slangen, verslaat, is een verhaalmotief dat in verscheidene Indo-Europese godsdiensten voorkomt. Het wordt Chaoskampf genoemd. Dit soort standbeelden zijn uniek aan Germanië en Oost-Gallië en deze specifieke voorstelling is dus niet van Romeinse oorsprong. Jupiter werd vertaald in een tafereel uit de plaatselijke mythologie, dat herkenbaar was voor de Romeinen.

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The Sardinian Tenores, A traditional song from the town of Oliena, Island of Sardinia, performed by a group named 'Tenore Santu Lussugliu'. In relation to the archaeological discoveries, historians guess the story of Tenores begins around 3,000 years ago. Although some might call this a neolithic style of chanting. Traditional singing is related to shepherding, loneliness, and being in touch with nature. The Tenores is often accompanied by evocative traditional dances and costumes. The tenor song is a “polyvocal” form in four parts, typical of the middle-north of Sardinia, where each part must be sung by a different male singer. Therefore the tenor group must be composed of four people. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCIoukLfmdXjc6dag9-7BR5g

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Ancient Finnish Lullaby 🇫🇮, 🇫🇮 Nuku, nuku nurmilintu, Väsy, väsy, västäräkki Nuku nurmelle hyvälle Vaivu maalle valkialle. Lintu tuopi liinahapaijan Haapana hyvän hamehen Kaskeloinen korvatyynyn Pääskynen peäalusen Nuku, nuku nurmilintu Väsy, väsy, västäräkki Nuku nurmelle hyvälle Vaivu maalle valkialle. 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Sleep, sleep meadow bird, Tired, tired, wagtail. Sleep well in the grass, Drift into the white land Birds will bring you a linen shirt, The wigeon will bring you a fine skirt. The duck a little pillow to rest your head The swallows, a cushion. Sleep, sleep meadow bird, Tired, tired, wagtail. Sleep well in the grass, Drift into the white land. Singer: Merja Soria Song: Nuku Nuku Nurmilintu Instrument: The Kantele Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCIoukLfmdXjc6dag9-7BR5g

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Preserved in English folk music is an instrument called the riddle drum. This is a modern name for a type of drum possibly having been once called a hylsung. The drum originated in Anglo-Saxon times as a farming tool, a sieve designed to remove husk from corn, a process called winnowing or riddling – hence the name. The instrument was played across the British isles, including Cornwall and Ireland where it was known as the English riddle.

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Today I built a little birdhouse from scrap wood I got for 5€. One hour of work and the base was finished. The roof still needs to be covered with roofing felt and all the wood covered with seed oil. (Yes, we use it to protect wood against water. Would never eat it!) #diy @EuropeanTribalism

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Breton artist Bleunwenn released the song Revenir aux Pierres (Morgane) "Return to the Stones (Morgane)" on YouTube and Bandcamp. All sales will go to the collective which is working on protecting the Roche Aux Fées dolmen, one of the biggest and so far well-preserved megalithic site in Europe, located in Brittany, France. You can find the French lyrics and their English translation on YouTube. ✨ Thank you for supporting both a folk & pagan artist and this ancestral European sacred site! 🧚🏻‍♀️ Likes and shares are welcome. 🙏🏻 Check the links in this posts for more info. 🌳

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Thank You Over the last year we have grown substantially, and it is thanks to you! Those who follow and share our content around, support our work by various means both financial and boosting morale. In the tradition of the season we wanted to take this moment to thank those who have helped us get where we are and others who are doing great work. First a Big Thank You To Our Friends Who have Been with Us Every Step of the Way. B.C. Neanderthal Mindset Aethelwulf Art Londor Artworks Luces Lejanas Geedunk Nautica The Moonraker Neanderthal News Projects of Others That We Are Glad Exist. We thank them for their hard work. American Folklore Preservation Pagan Places English Folk Song The Jolly Reiver Celtiberi Folk We Thank These Channels for sharing our content around, such support whether they agree with us or not was deeply appreciated. The American Spirit The Old Ways Tribe of the Fox The Wandering Spartan Frith & Folk Tribal Europe Wisconsin Rural Folk Society Folk Wisdom & Ways Slavia Old European Art & Aesthetics Some smaller channels To Take a Look At, See if you like them and if you do give 'em a follow, Paying It Forward. Afibjorn Northern Volk Botanica Americana Once Again Thank You To All of our Subscribers and Supporters Sincerely Hyperborean Radio (Uncensored)

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Scotlandwell, At the western side of Scotlandwell village in the Portmoak District of Perth & Kinross, Central Scotland, there is an ancient holy well and also a 19th century wash-house. The village is 4 miles west of Glenrothes and 4 miles east of Kinross (across Loch Leven). In the late 1st century AD the Romans came by the well (it is on Pictish soil) and named it ‘Fons Scotiae’ and in the late 13th century the local friars were using the water in their hospice and, in the early 14th century the well was visited by Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland, who took the waters here in the hope of a cure. Later the well was visited by Mary, Queen of Scots (1542-87). The well became a place of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages and continued as such for several centuries thereafter. To reach the site (signposted) head west from Kinross on the A911 (Leslie Road) and go through Scotlandwell village. Where the A911 ends cross over Main Street and walk along the short lane (Little Arnot); the well is on the left at the far end. The ancient curative spring known as Scotlandwell or ‘Fons Scotiae’ (Well of Scotland) at the foot of Bishop Hill (Portmoak Moss) bubbles up from deep underground through the sandy earth and into the stone-built well with its Victorian (Gothic) well-house structure, most of which is a clever reconstruction of 1858, although some of the lumps of stonework at the front of the well predate this and are probably from the earlier Medieval structure. Its healing waters were ‘said’ to be a cure for leprosy and other diseases. The green-painted wood and stone structure at the back with its canopy roof also dates from the mid 19th century. This whole site is now in a fairly well-preserved state thanks to a local community project. A plaque with the date 1858 is carved onto the stone well-head along with the architect’s name and also the benefactors’ names in capital letters. The nearby Wash House, built in 1860, which local people called ‘The Steamie’ and where laundry was washed, was presumably connected to the well’s underground water source, but sadly it has not been in use since the 1960’s. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCIoukLfmdXjc6dag9-7BR5g

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Ojáncano, Ojáncano is a cyclops found in Cantabrian mythology, and is an embodiment of cruelty and brutality. It appears as a 10 to 20 foot tall giant with superhuman strength, with hands and feet that contain ten digits each, and two rows of teeth. With a very wild and beast-like temperament, it sports a long mane of red hair, and just as much facial hair, with both nearly reaching to the ground. Apparently the easiest way of killing an Ojancanu is to pull the single white hair found in its mess of a beard. The females (called Ojáncana) are virtually the same, though without the presence of a beard. However, the females have long drooping breasts that like their male counterpart's hair, reach the ground. In order to run, they must carry their breasts behind their shoulders. The strangest thing about these peculiar cyclopean species is their reproduction process. Instead of mating, when an old Ojancanu dies, the others distribute the insides and bury the corpse under an oak or yew tree. He is constantly doing evil deeds such as pulling up rocks, destroying huts and trees, and blocking water sources. He fights Cantabrian brown bears and Tudanca bulls, and always wins. He only fears the Anjanas, the good Cantabrian fairies. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCIoukLfmdXjc6dag9-7BR5g

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European Robin Folklore, The European robin (Roodborstje 🇳🇱 literally meaning red breast) is known scientifically as Erithacus rubecula. According to European traditions, the robin is associated with storms but It is also the harbinger of death. A robin tapping on the window symbolizes the death of a loved one. The return of the robin to the woods indicates the arrival of spring after a dreary winter. A Robin’s song (slide 3) is easy to recognize: it is sweet, melodious, and also wistful and melancholy – it symbolizes hope, rebirth, and also danger. The flashing of robin’s red breast or chest is almost always a symbol of danger. In Germanic heathen times, it is stated that the little robin was under the protection of Thor due to its red chest, representing blood which is dear to the thundering God (who himself, is said to have red hair) In Germany, they believe that if a robin nests under your eaves, the house will be protected from fire. However, some others believe it is a bad omen. The Celtic tribes, cherish a peculiar veneration for the tiny birds, the robin, and wren. (Robin and Wren are of the same species) The killing of the robin or wren is said to entail on the perpetrator some injury to the person or his property by fire. The Irish believe that if they kill a robin, a large lump will grow on their hands, which will prevent them from working. In Wales, the robin is known as burnt breast and if the robin continues to sing long and melancholy tunes, it may be a sign of rain. If a robin dies in your hand, it will shake like palsy forever. In Scotland, the song of the robin is considered to bring ill omen, even death, especially to a sick person who hears it. In Italy, killing a robin can cause a person to suffer from epilepsy. Seeing two robins fight indicates that you are in for a surprise. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ Telegram: t.me/TribalEuropa

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Revontulet 🇫🇮, The Northern Lights have mystified, terrified and inspired humans for thousands of years. Over the centuries and millennia, the people of the Arctic have had different interpretations, myths and beliefs about the Northern Lights, some of them bloody, some of them happy. The Finnish word for the Northern Lights translates to “fox fires”. The firefox is a mythical and elusive creature of the North coveted by hunters. Legend has it that a person who catches the firefox would be rich and famous beyond belief. As it runs along the fells, the fox’s flaming tail whips crystals of snow into the sky and the fur scratches the trees, setting the skies on fire. There is a small element of truth in this explanation as fur can be charged with static energy, producing sparks. Indigenous Canadians had similar ideas about the fur of their reindeer. Another explanation for the Finnish name, revontulet, is the word “repo”, used by the Forest Finns, meaning a spell. Spellfires, caused by forces of darkness and light waging war in the sky. Ancient Finns believed that the soul of a hunter passes on to a Siberian jay, which were thus regarded as soulbirds. Killing a Siberian jay would bring bad fortune to a hunter. Auroras, like the Siberian jay, have often been thought of as spirits of the dead. Auroras sometimes form arcs across the sky. In the Kalevala, the national epic of Karelia and Finland, the Northern Lights are referred to as the gates of the north. In some Karelian dialects, the auroras are still called “fiery pillars”, referring to the gates. In the Kalevala, the people of the north were usually seen as the enemy and the gates of the north frequent the stories of travel to north. On rare occasions when auroras are powerful enough to be seen in middle and southern Europe, they are usually red in color. No wonder the French, Italians and Greeks of times past saw them as sure signs of blood to be spilled. In comparison, various groups in the north believed the red flames to be caused by fallen soldiers clashing with giants. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ Telegram: t.me/TribalEuropa

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Baldr was so beloved that his mother Frigg took oaths from everything in the world that they would not harm him, save the mistletoe which she deemed too young. I am sure you all know the rest. As all myths, this one too contains multifaceted symbols. Firstly, it is a myth of the cycle of seasons, oh which the Norsemen reckoned there to be two: summer and winter. Baldr, the bright beautiful god beloved by all, is clearly the summer or the summer sun and Hǫðr, the blind god who "kills" Baldr is the dark winter (thus his blindness). Mistletoe is Baldr's weakness because it is a parasitic plant that remains green on trees after the winter arrives, seemingly "killing" the life of summer. The reason that Hel requires all things on the earth to weep for Baldr in order that he returns from death is because of the rains that precede the return of summer ("April showers bring May flowers"). I will post further about the deeper meanings of this myth, but I'd like to hear your thoughts of its meaning in the comments.

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Geestentijd. Het begin van de winter is een sombere tijd wat betreft feestdagen. Allerheiligen, Allerzielen en eeuwigheidszondag; al deze feestdagen hebben een band met de dood. Dit is geen recent of puur christelijk gegeven: ook in de voorchristelijke traditie werd deze periode gezien als een van geesten. In Scandinavië werd vroeger, na de oogst aan het begin van de winter, een offermaand gehouden. Zowel in privé verband als in grote festiviteiten werden geesten (alven, 'dísir,' ...) en de Walvader (Woen/Wodan) vereerd. Dit deed men hoogstwaarschijnlijk door van heilige vuren op altaars aan te steken en door bloed en mede op te offeren. Een soortgelijke traditie leeft voort in ons Sint-Maartenfeest. Het aansteken van vreugdevuren, het paraderen met lampen, een bebaarde man en Zwarte Pieten (pietje de dood) komen allemaal aan bod. De diepere betekenis van dit alles lijkt echter bij velen verdwenen te zijn. Zonnevlam wenst jullie een zalige Sint-Maarten en een witte winter toe! 🜨🔥 t.me/Zonnevlam.

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Mārtiņi, Mārtiņi or Mārtiņdiena is an ancient Latvian winter welcoming holiday, when the time of pieguļa and shepherding came to an end. According to a solar calendar, Mārtiņdiena marks the midpoint between the autumnal equinox (Miķeļi) and winter solstice (Ziemassvētki), and is celebrated on the 10th of November. Mārtiņi ended Veļu laiks (Time of the Dead, see yesterday's post) and started Ledus laiks (Time of Ice), when the swamp became passable and raids of armed men sitting on horses were expected. In Finland day is known as Martinpäivä and in Estonia as Mardipäev. Martini was named after the Catholic St.Martin of Tours or Martin Luther, the founder of Lutheranism. Day of St.Martin is celebrated all over Europe, but the holiday itself is way older and the name of it is based on the French word morti and Latin mori meaning death. In pre-Christian times in Latvia Martini was celebrated to honour the horse god Martinš. He was a dual god. In the springtime, he would turn into god Usinš. During the night of Martini young ladies threw their skirts to the floor before going to bed and in the dream, their future spouse would pick it up. A protection ritual for the horses was done, where a rooster was sacrificed. On the eve of Martini, the horse´s mouth was touched with the rooster, then it was lifted towards the sun & blood of the rooster was dropped to the horse oats. Latvians worshipped the sun goddess Saule so lifting the rooster towards the sun was a sacrificial gift for the goddess. On the next day, the left-back food of the horse was painted with blood. The dead rooster was smudged in the stable and was put inside the bread and carried around the building to drive away from the evil spirit. Festivities included masquerade parades, sleigh riding, dances and preparing lots of food. There was also martiparades going on around Martini. Big martis were grown-ups and small martis were children. Marti´s were people who painted their faces and dressed up as spirits of the dead. These parades were common in other countries as well like Austria, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Estonia. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ Telegram: t.me/TribalEuropa

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VEĻU LAIKS, Late autumn – October, November – the leaves have fallen, the field work is done, the weather is often foggy, there is time for reflection…. This time of year, once the wolves begin to howl in autumn, is called Veļu laiks (“The Time of the Spirits”) or sometimes Dievaines. The same term or variations of it, such as Veļu vakars, is also used to denote a specific day of remembrance and of honoring the deceased. This is not really a traditional Latvian holiday in the sense of solstices and equinoxes. It doesn’t even fall on a specific date. Rather, Veļu vakars, a very personal and private doing, can take place anytime during mid to late autumn. Latvians divide the person into three parts: the physical body (augums), the soul (dvēsele), and the spirit (velis). According to Latvian tradition, it is often believed that upon death, the physical body returns to the earth, the soul returns to live in an otherworld often called “The Other Side of the Sun” (aizsaule), and the spirit continues to live for a while in a parallel universe. The spirits’ lives in this parallel universe pretty much mirror their past lives here: farmers continue farming, women weave and sew clothing, children herd pigs, etc. Unmarried spirits can even find mates and get married there: a folk verse says that if it rains while the sun is shining, a spirit wedding is taking place. Besides veļi, there are several other regional names for the spirits of the deceased, such as leļi, iļği, ķūķi, vecīši, pauri, and ēni. Spirits are not considered scary or evil. Rather, the left-over waves of energy of the deceased, Spirits are thought to eventually fade away, just as memories fade over time. When invited on Veļu laiks, though, the spirit of a dead person is said to be able to come back to this side to visit, thus forming a close and intimate bond between the generations. The deceased were for the most part remembered only among their own families and local communities, and therefore Veļu vakars was usually a very personal and private occasion. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ Telegram: t.me/TribalEuropa

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Welsh Nursing Shawls (Siôl Fagu) 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿, The traditional Welsh nursing shawl, siôl fagu, is made of pure wool Welsh flannel. It is six feet square, including six inch fringes on all four sides. Nursing shawls were a staple product of the Welsh woollen mills. The shawls are practical for carrying a baby, the baby being held in front, high up, with the mother’s right arm free, the left arm helping support the baby but still useful. It provides warmth for the baby and mother, and easy communication between them. When the baby is in the crib it serves as a crib cove. The shawls are useful as a cosy wrap, or as a throw for a chair or couch. In the nineteenth century shawls were used as outer garments by both men and women. Grandfathers used to be seen carrying the babies in shawls on the seafront in Swansea on Sunday mornings, giving the young couples a chance to sleep in. This also ensured continuation of the family. There were many varieties of shawls made, from heavy blanket shawls to lighter weight flannel. Melin Teifi, operating in the old Cambrian Mill in Dreyfach (maintained as a museum by the Welsh Folk Museum) continues to make the traditional flannel shawl. The older equipment has been renovated to allow the shawls to be made in traditional fashion. In use, the shawl is first doubled as a triangle and placed over both shoulders. The baby is then lifted into place on the left shoulder and the corner of the shawl on the left is wrapped around the baby. The corner of the shawl on the right is then dropped under the arm and wrapped around the baby. The right arm is fully free. Shawls passed from mother to daughter in Wales as family heirlooms. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ Telegram: t.me/TribalEuropa

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Dziady, Slavic Day of the Dead, The Slavs didn’t celebrate Halloween historically, but they have their own version, called Dziady (pronounced: ‘JAH-dyh’), which is the celebration of the dead. Sometimes translated as Forefathers’ Eve, Dziady was celebrated twice per year – once in spring and fall. The reverence of ancestors was often considered an important element of Slavic mythology, as the domovoy/domowik imply, and Dziady follows in this tradition as well. Early Slavs believed souls returned from the underworld, during certain times of the year, and the end of October was one of those times. This celebration with the spirits of the afterlife took place in graveyards, where great fires were built to provide light for the deceased and for them to warm themselves. People would feast and eat plentifully but would drop food on the graves. The giving of sacrificial blood, as well as clothes and food such as kasha (a type of porridge), eggs, honey, and even vodka, was meant to offer ease to the souls as they make the difficult travel to Nawia. While Nawia was considered a positive afterlife, the journey to it is difficult. Another crucial part of the festival was showing the way of the souls back to Nawia through dances around the fires. The Slavs didn’t have pumpkin carving, but they did carve Karaboshka masks. People would wear these masks, made of wood or clay, at night to imitate the dead. Then, with torches in hand, they would lead the dead to the underworld. On their way back home, people would leave out offerings for the wandering spirits who had no family to give them gifts or show them home. Murderers and those who died unnaturally lingered on Jawia (earth) as demons. These could strike many nights, but the danger was only stronger on a night like Dziady. To prevent these attacks, people dropped green branches on the graves of those that they passed. Then, fires were set on those graves and at crossroads (considered powerful in Slavic myths) to keep away the demons. Follow Tribal Europe: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TribalEurope... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tribal.europe/ Telegram: t.me/TribalEuropa

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